Frequently Asked Questions

16 Questions

Please see our rates & fees page for customer fees at this link: Rates & Fees You may also want to view our Residential Customer Tips for more billing information.

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The side sewer permit application is available on this website (sewer permit forms). Please complete the application and submit it to our office prior to paying any permit or connection fees. The District has up to 3 working days to review your application. Your contractor must be current on their registration in order for the permit to be approved. Once approved, the permit/connection fees may be paid. The District requires at least a 24-hour notice to schedule an inspection. 

An annexation to the District is initiated by a petition of landowners, followed by formal hearings and the ultimate approval of the Snohomish County Boundary Review Board. You may access more information about annexing property on this website by looking at the Annexation Forms page. Or you may contact our office at (425) 334-8588. 

  • It is typical in many Public Utilities (both City and Districts) to establish a fixed base rate for sewer service irrespective of the volume of water used. 
  • The primary reason is that sewer infrastructure has high fixed costs; therefore setting a fixed rate to cover costs is common.
  • The sewer rates established not only account for water flows from homes, but the deep pipes around a lake environment are below the water table.
  • The Sewer District infrastructure must accommodate not only “infiltration” from a high water table but also peak flows during the winter and high volume spikes in service which are often on Saturdays and Sundays.

The public is invited to attend Sewer District meetings, which are held regularly on the 2nd and 4th Thursdays of each month. Information is also posted regularly on this web site. View District calendar

To receive information on the new Sunnyside Wastewater Treatment Plant, you may contact our District Office at 425-334-8588

The District is governed by a three-member Board of Commissioners elected to six-year terms. See the Overview section for details. 

  • Today, there are close to 2,000 less homes and dozens less businesses than predicted by County growth targets adopted when the Treatment Plant construction loans were approved.
  • Despite substantial cost cuts by the District, construction of homes and businesses have not fully rebounded from the Great Recession to spread the fixed cost among more customers.
  • The investments in pumps, treatment, deep pipelines, etc. for sewer systems are typically double those investments required for municipal water systems. 
  • Similarly, power needs for pump stations and trucking requirements for solid waste add to the expenses.
  • Water systems use shallower with smaller utility pipes.

There are approximately 12,000 sewer connections within the District (including connections within the City of Lake Stevens). 

Call our office at (425) 334-8588 and provide us with the updated billing account information. We would appreciate knowing the new owner's name, phone number, property address as well as mailing address. 

The Lake Stevens Sewer District offices are open Monday-Friday from 7:30 AM to 5:30 PM. The office is closed on most governmental holidays. 

We have 3 payment options:

  • 1) In front of our office building- just outside the front door.
  • 2) In downtown Lake Stevens, you’ll see the box in the Library’s parking lot next to a mail box.
  • 3)  At Bartell's in Frontier Village - located in the back of the store at the post office counter.

It actually costs less to send all our customers a statement than it costs to have staff remove them for certain accounts. Also, some customers have commented that they appreciate receiving the statement because it reminds them to deduct the amount from their check register. 

Yes. The District requires developers to pay connection fees for every house they plan to connect to the sewer system. In fact, the District has already set aside $15 million dollars in developer fees for the cost of constructing the new treatment plant (with $22 million expected over the next decade). 

The main reason was the fact that the District had secured $77 million dollars in low-interest loans from the State. This was a huge achievement. So, even though the bid to construct came in higher than anticipated, if the District did not move forward to construct the plant, the funding would have been lost. It is unlikely the District would have an opportunity for such a large amount of state funding in the future (as there are so many other agencies that apply). Without low-interest loans, the debt for the plant would be much greater, which in turn means higher rates for our customers. 


Questions
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